Lutz Popper

Lutz Popper

SternEnzym

Lutz Popper read food technology at the Berlin University of Technology, followed by research and instruction activities at the Institute of Food Technology.
In his Ph.D. thesis he treated the extraction and application of anti-microbial enzymes.
Since December 1993, Popper is with SternEnzym, as head of research and development, and since 2009 also as scientific director of the Stern-Wywiol Group. He is an external lecturer for food technology at the Kiel University of Technology since 1997, at the University of Applied Sciences, Hamburg, since 2013 and at the Beuth University of Applied Sciences, Berlin, since 2015 and has contributed more than 170 articles, posters and lectures and one book to the field of food science.

The role of enzymes in biscuit, cracker and wafer manufacturing

There is no baking without enzymes because they are an essential part of the living nature. Grains store energy in starch and protein and re-mobilise it upon sprouting, both with the help of enzymes. For optimal baking properties, flour requires a certain enzyme activity, depending on the application. Due to natural fluctuations, the enzyme presence in grains varies substantially, requiring standardisation of the activity in the mill or the bakery. Furthermore, enzymes may be used to optimise the baking properties. In this case, they are added in the form of flour from sprouted grain (malt flour), or, more commonly today from microbial sources, i.e. fungi, bacteria and yeast. This presentation briefly describes the function of intrinsic and in particular of added enzymes on biscuit, cracker and wafer manufacturing properties of flour. It will show the options of the enzymes to improve the quality of the baked goods, to avoid problems associated with the structure of dough and final goods, the potential to save on raw materials, energy costs and processing time, and it will discuss possibilities to reduce acrylamide levels.